Chelmsford, England

The site is located to the South East of Chelmsford Located around 32 miles to the northeast of London and around 20 miles to the Heybridge basin and the English Channel beyond. Chelmsford is split into three by the Rivers Can and Chelmer and the site is located to the South of the confluence of the two rivers at the beginning of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Corridor linking Chelmsford to Maldon. The area is known as the Chelmer Waterside, the adjoining Springfield basin was the terminus of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Corridor opened in 1797 to serve Chelmsford. With this came the wharfs for coal, lime and timber and the gas works founded in 1819 together with dwellings for those working in the new industries.

Land nick names, Neologisms and slang terms

the former Jewsons site

Location


Address

Land between Parkway and the River Chelmer on the Army and Navy roundabout, Chelmsford, Essex, UK

Land Topography

Size of the Land in sqm (approx.)

4900

Surfaces

  • Grass/moss in patches
  • Tyres
  • concrete

Features

  • Shopping trolleys
  • Underground stream
  • Large Buddleia shrubs and other scrub
  • Wooden signage board
  • Danger of death signage
  • Large wooden hoarding
  • Chain-link fencing with barbed wire on top
  • Small brick building
  • Constant road noise from the adjacent Parkway Road and Army and Navy roundabout.
  • Large expanse of water meadow and public open space to the North East
  • The River Chelmer
  • Elevated views into the site from the flyover
  • A Public Footpath to the north
  • 17thC mill house
  • Adjacent businesses; namely a Tesco Homestore and the Moulsham Mill Craft and Business Centre
  • Big trees on the Southern and Eastern boundaries

Land status and definition

Basic

  • Vacant

Legal Status

  • In Private Ownership

Current Land Owner

Jewsons and Moulsham Mill Partnership

Known intended future use by the land owner(s)

The local government would like to see a new food store for the city located on the site, within the constraints of the highly prominent location. They would also like to see a mixture of food shopping to a maximum of 4,600sqm gross, craft-related businesses, a conference and meeting space, small business units, eating and drinking and office or leisure activities. They are keen to encourage distinctive innovative land uses and business types that help to promote the area.

Historical (basic)

The site is located to the South East of Chelmsford Located around 32 miles to the northeast of London and around 20 miles to the Heybridge basin and the English Channel beyond. Chelmsford is split into three by the Rivers Can and Chelmer and the site is located to the South of the confluence of the two rivers at the beginning of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Corridor linking Chelmsford to Maldon. The area is known as the Chelmer Waterside, the adjoining Springfield basin was the terminus of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Corridor opened in 1797 to serve Chelmsford. With this came the wharfs for coal, lime and timber and the gas works founded in 1819 together with dwellings for those working in the new industries.

The course of the river Can and Chelmer has changed significantly since the 1960’s with the introduction of the flood defence scheme which has changed the area so that the mill no longer rests against the banks of the Chelmer. A Mill stood on the site for over 1000 years and is listed in the Doomsday Book of 1086. The existing wooden building dates back to 1819 with substantial repairs carried out in 1860 and further brick built extensions in 1890.

The river and surrounding landscape now stands as the functional flood zone, the river resembling a controlled channel that seems to be fully controlled by the actions of man. The area has changed dramatically in the last forty years. The Chelmsford Flood Protection Scheme introduced the automatic sluice and has involved the realignment of the rivers leaving the historic mill isolated from the waters which engendered its being.

Weblinks

Land Access

Accessibility

  • Accessible with effort

The land is not accessible to the general public, unless you happen across an opening in the fence and hoarding at some point. There is a public footpath that runs along the Northern edge that gives excellent views into the site. The adjacent businesses are confronted with an unattractive vacant lot steadily collecting rubbish blown in on the wind and intentionally dumped waste. There are a number of gates and entrances that could provide direct access into the site.

Borders

All of the borders are well defined by large trees, fences and hoarding.

Land Users

Land is occupied by

  • No one

Activities

Collecting wind blown rubbish

Compare to Wasteland


Explorers